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Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
. and the hospital has pointed out that they probably broke the law, at least that's the advice the hospital's received. this is a few other things the chief executive said. >> technically i think this was a breach of patient confidentiality, which i regret. having said that, the information which was inadvertently revealed is already in the public domain. i think this whole thing is pretty deplorable. our nurses are caring, professional people not to cope with journalistic trickery of this sort. >> max foster reporting for us. you get the point what's going on. pranksters in australia, potentially could be in some trouble despite their apology. we'll continue to watch the story. we, of course, wish the duchess of cambridge only the best. >>> meanwhile, important new research that could impact people that take aspirin to reduce the risk of hard attacks and strokes. a common coating used on aspirin, stand by we'll give you details. for pain, it's just for sleep. because sleep is a beautiful thing. ♪ zzzquil, the non-habit forming sleep-aid from the makers of nyquil. well, having a ton of lo
experience. he is a graduate of yale law school. he clerked for the conservative judge james buckley on the u.s. court of appeals for the d.c. circuit following graduation. so you have to ask why did it take seven months for the senate to finally after waiting seven months, we'll talk about it for 20 minutes, then we'll vote his nomination. why the seven-month delay? republican obstruction. now, after this vote, the senate remains backlogged with 17 judicial nominations that go back to before the august, the august recess. senate republicans are establishing another harmful precedent by refusing to proceed on judicial nominees with bipartisan support before the end of the session. they held up judicial nominees three years ago, they did it two years ago, they did it last year. now they are doing it again this year. they found a new way to employ their own trick of a pocket filibuster. they stalled nominees into the next year. and then they forced the senate in the new year to work on nominees from the past year. delay and delay and delay and push other confirmations back in time, then cut off
saying that such action would not only be completely unacceptable but a clear breach of international law. hours ago white house press secretary jay carney says he thinks syria's leaders have gotten the messages. >> it's hard for me to imagine that they are not fully aware of the seriousness of the president's position on this, the seriousness with which we would take the prospect of the use of chemical weapons. >> shepard: u.s. officials say they have recently spotted the syrian military moving around chemical weapons components. syria is believed to have enormous stockpiles of chemical weapons, gases that can kill people by raising blisters on their lungs or shutting down their nervous systems. as bashar assad's regime gross desperate the chances of him unleashing those weapons are growing. the fighting that began last year in syria has killed at least 40,000 people. if president assad gives the go ahead for the chemical weapons attacks it's hard to predict how many more would dyed. we have team fox coverage tonight jonathan hunt at the united nations first to james rosen at the state d
to take these young women when they are interacting with law enforcement because a lot of them find themselves into prostitution and get treated like perpetrators as opposed to victims. this is the psychology of a perpetrator but they are victims and we have to get law enforcement and our judicial system to treat these women as victims and put them in a setting to pull themselves away from drug addition. >> in a minute, politico is -- politico is going to ask you some questions. one of the questions that has come in, who is the best leader in washington, d.c.? >> robert griffin, iii. >> why did the majority of americans reject the republican party in the recent election? >> it was an election and it was a very close election. if you look at the nims and the differences between the two. i think the republican party can do a better job of limited government and freep enterprise movement and connect those policies. >> why has there been a failure to connect? >> i'm not sure there is one reason for it and i haven't had time to think about it why it has happened but it needs to happen. t
a 60-day notice of potential layoffs to workers required by law. >> for to us have gone this long a period of time, without making any preparations for it, i think is a gross disservice to the american people. >> for months the pentagon officials have been speaking descriptively about the impact of the cuts. >> face the prospect of budget sequestration. that would be devastating to national security. >> more detailed look comes from the economiststein fuller at george mason university. he finds that a $45.1 million reduction of purchase of military equipment at research and development alone would reduce gdp by $86.5 billion and result in loss of 1 1,600,000 00 across all sector of the economy impacting every state and representing decline of personal income. but those numbers represent a small fraction of proposed defense cuts. d.o.d. would absorb $55 billion in cuts every year through 2021. long-held doctrine of maintaining force capable of fighting two wars would be strained. with the obama administration, shift to asia, as a new focus on the u.s. operations. >> it would requir
catherine. the our plan put rates signed into law by ronald reagan in 1986. melissa: got to go. i want to really quickly. why do we continue to talk about raising taxes and we're not talking about cutting spending? we can't get there. >> we never are, are we? >> sure. the tax reform plan is part of a larger $4 trillion deficit reduction plan has spending cuts in it. you need to do it in a balanced way. 485 billion in medicare. >> i'm sorry. 385 dal billion on top of savings we already have in medicare. melissa: i would love for both of you to come back. we have to do more in depth. you're fantastic. >> thanks for having me. melissa: here is the question of the day. could have done that the whole show. do you support higher taxes on cigarettes, alcohol and online gambling to reduce the deficit? we want to hear what you think. like us on facebook.co facebook.com/melissafrancisfox or follow me on twitter at melissaafrancis. >>> egyptian president morsi attempts to restore order on cairo streets. protesters respond with molotov cocktails. has he lost control? details coming up next. >> mil
into a dictator who is ramming through a constitution that while it does not specify sharia law as the ruling factor nonetheless has various clauses that take the country toward sharia law over the coming years. i think they are embarrassed. we can't change egypt. but we give them well over $1 billion in aid a year and we can play on the margins. bill: many people think egypt is the next iran if morsi continues on the path he's on. do we cut off aid in this case? >> the bod i language, the tone suggests the white house is willing to go along with morsi. the reason morsi and the muslim brotherhood are pushing this through so swiftly is because the egyptian economy is tanking. tourism has almost zeroed out. when was the last time you bought a product manufactured in egypt. beyond the religion except for the real he can realists, what the poor of egypt want is a job. they want economic improvements and morsi knows he can't deliver on a reasonable time frame so he's ramming through this constitution hell for leather because he can do it now and wouldn't be able to do it later. bill: i was surpris
to break open the atm. >>> there is a renewed push in virginia tonight to change the laws when it comes to texting and driving. police need another reason to pull you over. texting while driving is a secondary offense. adam tuss explains how one local county is getting around the rules to hand out more tickets and stop the dangerous and growing problem. >> reporter: you don't have to be out on the roads long to see it. drivers texting. some even cruising down the interstate at high speeds. we saw this driver rolling along at 60 miles per hour today. he just kept rolling, and rolling, and about 20 seconds later put down the phone. here in fairfax county, police have been using a law called failure to pay full-time attention to pull over drivers who are texting, or are distracted behind the wheel. >> not a day goes by that people don't notice other drivers texting while driving. and our officers are doing what they can to enforce this. >> reporter: and she tells news4 these kinds of violations have skyrocketed. in 2009, about 7,000 offenses. in 2010, over 9,000. last year, and this year,
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for ratification of a united nations treaty on the rights of the disabled, which was modeled on a law passed by the senate. 22 years ago, the americans with disabilities act. in effect, it was a vote to export american law to the 155 nations around the world that have signed this treaty. a treaty that has already been ratified by 126 of those countries, including the united kingdom, france, germany, china, russia has ratified it. now you can pass anything in the senate with 60 votes. except treaties which require 66. a two-thirds majority. every democrat voted for the treaty and only eight republicans voted for the treaty. 38 republicans disgraced themselves and disgraced the senate. by voting against it and controlling the outcome. john kerry tried everything he could on the senate floor to show republicans the way to vote for this treaty. >> it really isn't controversial. what this treaty says is very simple. it just says that you can't discriminate against the disabled. it says that other countries have to do what we did 22 years ago when we set the example for the world and passed the am
more liberal editions say it is sharia law that fail to protect the rights of minorities and women. >>> the duchess of cambridge is said to be feeling better this morning after treatment for cute morning sickness. prince william's wife is expected to stay in king edwards hospital for several days. >> reporter: good morning charlie. the news today seems to be better. after spending a second day at the hospital with his wife, prince william left her looking a lot more relaxed. kate is, quote, continuing to feel better and it seems that the prince was feeling a little better, too. kate is generally an active woman, a bit of a jock at school as she showed in her last public appearance before the onset of the illness. doctors say there's no reason she shouldn't continue to respond to treatment. while she's been a natural at the meet and greet part of the job, the most important part of her job has always been to provide heirs to the throne. that will get priority now. given the delicate start to her delicate condition, we're bound to see less of her over the next few months. >> i think
revenue. >> the economy is in a different position, the president actually did sign into law a series of cuts, he's proposed a lot in his 2013 budget. it's not like he's been stagnant. we've been having this argument throughout the presidential campaign and guess what? as we keep saying, americans said we're not buying it. the conditions have changed, the economy has changed, i think the outlook in the picture has changed. that's part of the reason the president is so firm about not going back to the debt ceiling conversation again and creating that level of instability and not bending on this issue of raisings the rates on the top 2%. >> yeah. i think -- >> go ahead. >> it's an important point. i think the american people are seeing that the president has already agreed to more than a year ago to that $1 trillion of cuts. that was 100% in cuts as part of the budget control act and he's always said we need a balanced approach. we can't do it through cuts alone. he has proposed additional cuts as part of the process but you need to have that revenue component to have the balanced appro
based on what has been american law since the first bush presidency 22 years ago. the treaty supported by every democrat and eight republicans, came five votes short of passage of the required 66 needed for ratification. 38 republicans voted no despite the return to the floor of former majority leader bob dole only days out of the hospital. there at the age of 89 to rally support from his former friends including orrin hatch, cluck grassley, mitch mcconnell and thad cochran but they voted it down. the floor manager john kerry called it one of the saddest days in his nearly 28 days in the senate which he says is broken and dysfunctional. the chairman of the foreign relations committee john kerry joins me now. thank you very much. you spoke of this passionately yesterday and you've had an overnight to think about this, but the moment was clearly so compelling watching bob dole on the floor, wheeled in by his wife, the former senator elizabeth dole and you and john mccain and other war veterans calling for passage of this, it tell me your thoughts today? >> my first thought, andrea, hate
. >> jennifer: right. so what would it take to double the minimum wage? you've got federal law and state laws. you would have to either go state by state or get an increase on the federal level is that what you're shooting for? the federal? >> what we're shooting for is to have the fast food industry come to the table. this is an industry, like you said, makes billions of dollars in profits and has made billions. record profits after the recession. they're recovering. the workers are not. they can afford to pay workers $15 an hour. the question is will they do it? >> jennifer: so have they come to the table? have you been able to have a conversation with them? >> i haven't heard from mcdonald's. i haven't heard from burger king or yum! brands. i don't think linda has either. so no. >> jennifer: linda, what was the mood on the picket line? how did customers respond when they saw the signs? >> they were pretty happy. they were for us. they told us keep fighting. >> jennifer: and so do you think, jonathan, will you t
the budget committee estimates the law will cost of that time. here we go. 2013 looks like an interesting, interesting year. this year the mighty mississippi river almost too shallow to even move barges, barges carrying food, fuel, other commodities. right now it is a very difficult passage on the mississippi. warm weather, drought, the reason the army corps of engineers typically would be releasing more water into the river from the missouri allow one barges to pass for another month or so, but the missouri river is also dramatically lowered to be this means billions of dollars of commerce will have to find alternative means to get to market. the midwest drought has increased the value. so much so there is a sharp increase in the theft of hay from fields. some farmers have resorted to putting gps tracking devices in those bales so that they can track a stolen. up next, house speaker turning -- running into medical opposition over his proposals. democrats sending mixed signals over what is on the negotiating table. that's right. and the "a-team" will be taking all of that and a great deal
. but the law is asinine. there is no reason why it should be taxed. >> c-1 government enforcement of the tax code as equalization for everybody? [talking over each other] [talking over each other] >> you believe someone should earns $40 billion year should pay one third the rate? [talking over each other] [talking over each other] >> let's make a critical distinction between the private sector, which is what we are talking about -- hedge funds and things that private money versus taxpayer money, which is what these teachers are being paid. those are apples and oranges. two different things. megyn: one thing i want to get back to you is they are clearly demonizing the rich in this country. they talked all about the 1% to the point where they actually have video of rich guys urinating on poor people. i mean, that is how they view the world. that this is what the rich think of people who don't make a lot of money. >> this is no coincidence. this video was not an accident. what we have seen over the last four years has been a concerted effort to demonize the rich. we have seen it through preside
9 custody cases, a basic principles of custody law is, you can't move the child around too much. even if the child is with the lesser in terms of benefits for the child, of the two parents, the mere removal of the child from a parent to whom the child has grown accustomed, the mere removal of the child from the home setting to which the child is accustomed, can have an adverse psychological affect on that child. stated differently, the longer the child stays with the mother in scotland even if she is not the appropriate parent, the more difficult it is in the courts to say, bring the child back to alabama. >>trace: thank you, judge, good of you. >> after more than a week and billions lost, the strike at two of america's biggest ports is now over. the deal that got workers back on the job is next. plus, fire bombs and bullets in the country that is supposed to be keeping the israelis and be keeping the israelis and palestinians from going to war. i plugged in snapshot, and 30 days later, i was saving big on car insurance. with snapshot, i knew what i could save before i switched
that option open. so while it's technically not illegal under international law for him to have this capability these are very, very dangerous products. gregg: speaking of illegal, people who commit crimes against humanity, war crimes are held in the dock at the international criminal court in the hague. there is talk now that bashar al-assad may try to seek asylum. should the u.s. position be no, you must be held to account for what you've done, or let's just get him out of here? >> well, i don't think the international criminal court is a legitimate organization under any circumstances, but in this case i think it posts the hard question whether this determination to prosecute somebody doesn't cause more death and destruction than giving somebody like bashar al-assad immunity, getting them out of the country and trying to end this conflict. the problem is it's hard to see who can give him that real grant, maybe the russians and that's why there is reporting that they are talking to bashar al-assad. but one reason i think he and other dictators tend to stay to the end is they d
, the last time we had this discussion for the 2010 law, remember. stuart: i remember. >> i said 3.5, that made sense from economists, made sense from the irs doing analysis on tax returns. that's what made sense. he they came out with 5 million so i was wrong and it was an an illogical numbers and there could be illogical numbers applied again. >> is it true you cannot put off forever the estate tax? you can delay it. >> taxes are deferral. you quick the can down the road and you hope you have a better tax situation or you have spent your money, for instance. people who are 40 can't do the same planning as people who are 70. stuart: hold on a second, i pass away and i pass away let's say 10 million to my children. and i do it, and i've been planning for it. and there's know tax when i pass away. the whole 10 million goes to the kids, but eventually, they have to pay taxes. >> that's right. this is-- when do they pay tax on it? >> when? >> they will pay tax on things when he they sell them. when they die, when they try to move things around and to me, it's basically a card game tha
appreciate you taking the time. explain this to me, if you would. what is this law change? >> essentially all it means is that it no longer makes a difference if you're a male or a female and you're in the line of succession to the thrown. both male and female will be treated equally as of october 2011. >> so it's retroactive. so if they can't get it fully passed, it's still okay. how far are we from actually seeing this law go through? is there any doubt? >> it was first announced in october of 2011. it went into effect immediately. it's going to be put into legislation. it will be a little while before we see it in writing but it was made effective as of october 2011. >> and so prince william was seen going to visit katherine at the hospital again today. how do we know how she's doing? given the situation, they were forced to announce this much earlier than they normally would have. >> right. she is in hospital for the next few days, she is being treated and he is by her side. hopefully it went be long before we see them again. >> and coming up, internet security pioneer john mcafee wanted
extended all of those changes in 2010. that's the law of the land still today. tax policy has been exactly the same over this continuum. what has changed, mr. speaker, what has changed is the spending. the reason deficits have grown not one, not two, not three but almost four times larger than the previous record deficit in american history is not because tax policy has changed, it hasn't. it's because federal spending policy has changed. and that's what we have to get our arms around here in this body. what i show going forward, mr. speaker, put a little square around the annual budget deficits that have been run during the first four years of the obama administration, but i also project what the congressional budget office believes, that's a nonpartisan budget planning group we have here on capitol hill, what they believe is in store for us in the future if we continue under current policy. -h tsh-that's trillion dollar deficits going out for years to come. the problem is not tax policy, mr. speaker, the problem is spending policy. can we improve tax policy? you better believe it. mr. sp
president and want more islamic law. his opponents say the president is forcing an islamic agenda down their throat. and today, the two sides clashed. on the door step of egypt's presidential palace, leading clashes, the fighting injured hundreds. the fighting is very fluid, sometimes the anti-morsy demonstrators, those right here will make advances just a few yards then get driven back. there are no police here, they are just two sides facing each other in the streets. as one side advances the other retreats. demonstrators kept police from the scene. there is still mistrust here, during the revolution of hosni mubarak. >> when the egyptian people go out again in the streets, they never go back. they must win, otherwise the muslim brotherhood will destroy egypt. >> reporter: a battle for the soul of the biggest country in the arab word. and tonight, brian, four of president morsy's 22 advisers have resigned in protest, saying president morsy should do more to bring calm here. brian? >> richard engel back here tonight in a familiar hot spot in cairo. >>> and the big story tonight has to
from what the palace says is extreme morning sickness. their laws are not strong out there. >> how are you doing? >> that's a good impression. >> you sound just like -- >> oh, my gosh. incredible. >> a whole lot of flow. absolutely. >> this morning police say a man has implicated himself in the death of that new yorker who was pushed on to the subway tracks. video released by police. 58-year-old victim, his name is ki-suck han standing casually as the alleged suspect argues with him just moments before he pushes him on to the path of an oncoming train. onlookers tried to wave down the train operator as han tried to climb back on the platform. the train's emergency breaks did not activate in time. han was struck and killed and many are asking if more could have been done to prevent this tragedy. it turned into outrage after "the new york post" published this picture. look at this for a moment. shows han in the seconds he was killed. the photographer who captured the image was beaten up yesterday in the media about why he didn't help and whether the post should have published this pi
political events yesterday was the president signing into law the mark twain co-membmmemorati act. they'll be sold with a surcharge to help respect research and education to honor the great man of letters. but there was another political event yesterday on the floor of the senate. that was the absolute reverse of this noble act of veneration. in the presence of a wheelchair-bound war hero, 89-year-old former senator bob dole, members gathered, hoping to ratify a united nations treaty that's based entirely on the americans with disabilities act. it would ensure that people with disabilities are granted the same general rights as anyone else. and it's a treaty that anyone with a modicom of sense and civic fairness would find impossible to oppose, as senator john kerry explained. >> bob dole, why is he here? he's not here because he's here to advocate for the united nations. he is here because he wants to know that other countries will come to treat the disabled the way we do. >> yet incredibly, republican[ç refused to support the treaty. the measure, which required a two-thirds majority
to do. neither are true. there is no requirement in this treaty whatsoever that any law in the united states would be changed, no new right would be created that doesn't exist already in the united states and most importantly because of the terminology of the treaty, the treaty language, thaáç it's not self-executing, that means nobody has recourse in any court in the united states of america to enforce the treaty. you might ask, why sign up to the treaty, then? the reason is this treaty is based on the gold standard of how america treats people with disabilities. it's based on americans with disabilities act and raises other countries to our standard. it's really exporting american sovereignty to other nations. it's exporting our values. and most importantly, it makes a real difference in the lives of people with disabilities, you know, born with a disability or something happens to them in life and they have one or veterans, for instance, who want to travel abroad, work abroad, study abroad, you know, just visit. this would have raised their quality of life and these senators turn
most of which at some point in time is going to become law. and the longer we put this off, the deeper the hole gets, so we're trying to focus on how do we get this done now-- >> woodruff: let me ask you about part of your plan. part of it would means test social security, medicare benefits. in order, the benefits would go down for those at the higher income levels. we had the economist paul krugman on the "newshour" last night who said that, you know, not only do the polls show many american oppose, this but he said the benefit you get, the money that would be raised from doing that is really not enough to overcome the pain that he said it would cause lower and middle-income americans. >> well, first of all, it would cause no pain to lower and middle-income citizens because they wouldn't be affected. and i agree, it's only one of the things that needs to occur. it's a small part. there are many manager transformative things that need to happen in social security and medicare and my bill outlines both transformative things to really make them solvent. there's a $27 trillion unfund lieb
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)

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